About your Search

20131028
20131105
STATION
CNNW 7
FBC 5
CSPAN 3
KQED (PBS) 2
CSPAN2 1
KPIX (CBS) 1
WHUT (Howard University Television) 1
WJZ (CBS) 1
LANGUAGE
English 31
Search Results 0 to 30 of about 31 (some duplicates have been removed)
on leaks by edward snowden. in a moment we will be joined by journalist glenn greenwald who first broke the snowden story. first, we turn to saturday's protest in washington. it was organized by the stop watching us coalition. jesselyn radack, a former justice department who now works for the government accountability project, read a message from edward snowden. >> we are here to remind our government officials that they are public service -- servants. this is about the unconstitutional, unethical, and immoral actions of the modern- day surveillance state, and how we all must work together to remind the government to stop them. know,bout our right to our right to associate freely, and to live in a free and open democratic society. [applause] witnessing an american moment in which ordinary people from high school to high office stand up to oppose a dangerous trend in government. we are told what is unconstitutional is not illegal. but we will not be fooled. we have not forgotten the fourth amendment in our bill of rights prohibits government that only from searching our personal effects
couldn't breathe at points because of excitement and shock. >> the source was edward snowden. >> the nsa specifically targets the communications of everyone. it ingests them by default. it collects them in it's system and it filters them and it analyzes them and it measures them and it stores them. >> up to that point, the director of national intelligence, who oversees nearly 20 u.s. intelligence agencies, had been telling the public a different story. >> does the nsa collect any type of data at all on millions or hundreds of millions of americans? >> no sir. >> it does not? >> not wittingly. there are cases where they could inadvertently, perhaps, collect, but not wittingly. >> after the snowden revelations, clapper apologized, explaining that he'd given the "least untruthful" answer. >> i sitting at my desk certainly had the authorities to wiretap anyone from you or your accountant to a federal judge to even the president if i had a personal email. >> so everything from learning all your metadata, with whom you're speaking, who's emailing you, where you are when you do it, how long yo
-kept secrets are out. by now, most of the world has heard the name edward snowden. the former national security agency contractor who released thousands of classified documents about government surveillance in one of the most significant leaks in u.s. history. he's been charged with espionage and has been living in russia under temporary asylum. the american journalist at the center of the story lives in brazil. >> we've had to come to rio to speak to glenn greenwald. he hasn't returned to the united states since he broke the story about the nsa surveillance programs for fear of being prosecuted. >> the nsa's goal really is the elimination of privacy globally. it is literally a system designed to monitor all forms of human behavior inside the united states, which is the ultimate surveillance state. >> last december, glenn greenwald received an email from a person who didn't identify himself. >> we still didn't know who he was, where he worked, but he was saying he had access to large amounts of very sensitive surveillance information that show the united states government was violating the law
forward. for edward snowden, it's a fate he was willing to risk. >> you live a privileged life. you're living in hawaii, in paradise, and making a ton of money. what would it take to make you leave everything behind? the greatest fear that i have regarding the outcome for america, of these disclosures, is that nothing will change. >> i think what the nsa in our nation is trying to do is protect our people and other people. you know, i would say, do you speak arabic? >> do i? no. maafi mushkila kil shi tamam, alhamdulillah. and so from my perspective, we want to have a world where there are no problems, where everything is ok, and we can say thanks. so from our perspective, we have to work together as nations to do that, and it takes intelligence and the least intrusive way we could think of was metadata. if, if anyone has any ideas how they can do it better, let us know. >> but what price are people willing to pay for security? and what could mass surveillance do to the nature of american society, and its promises of democracy, liberty and privacy? >> if you allow the government, th
, ever since edward snowden exposed them. calls to rein them in grew louder when it was revealed the u.s. was eavesdropping not only on enemies, but allies. on capitol hill two of america's top intelligence officials made an impassioned defense and here's homeland security correspondent bob orr. >> reporter: the director of national intelligence today confirmed the n.s.a. has long spied on friendly foreign leaders to understanding the thinking of both enemies and allies. >> it's invaluable to us to know where countries are coming from, what their policies are, how that would impact us across a whole range of issues. >> reporter: german chancellor angela merkel has accused the u.s. of monitoring her personal cell phone. senate intelligence committee member, republican susan collins, said today that's inappropriate. >> there's absolutely no justification for our country to be collecting intelligence information on the leaders of some of our closest allies. >> reporter: but before the house intelligence committee, clapper was unapologetic. >> some of this reminds me a lot of classic movie
. >> the work of the n.s.a. is under fire, because of revelations by former n.s.a. analyst edward snowden. documents he leaked revealed the n.s.a. has been collecting phone calls and text messages of millions of american citizens. the author of the patriot act has proposed a new law called the freedom act aimed at ending the sweeping phone tapping program. the act would stop drag net collection of phone calls of american citizens, place stronger restrictions on who is targeted and appoint a special advocate to the super secret fisa courts to protect privacy rights. national security director told the committee the content of phone calls remain secret, in a virtual lock box unless there is a link to possible terrorism and that he says is rare. >> they would only be looked at when we had reasonable and articulatable suspicion that we had connection to a foreign or al-qaeda terrorists group and look into that box. in 2012, we had 288 such selectors that we could go and look into that. that's it. of the billions of records, only 288. >> at the hearing, there was relatively little discussion a
recently of a man looking like edward snowden doing his grocery shopping and now it seems he's got himself a normal job. but it's likely given the fact that he's an i.t. specialist he's not going to be sitting in some big room with a load of other techies, he's probably going to do it remotely. there are security concerns around him, so he's probably not going to be very clear or very public about where he's working from. >> it sounds like he's going to stay in russia, forever i mean. it's starting to sound more like that at least. >> well, his father, lawrence snowden, came to visit him a few weeks back and said he was doing very well in russia, he was grateful to the russian authorities for having granted him asylum that he felt he could lead a normal life here and that he was able to find a job here, and there have been a lot of companies who have been public about the fact that they've been looking to recruit edward snowden. he's obviously a name that you would want to have up there on your text specitech specialist and the russian version of facebook tried to recruit him earlier on. t
with the former vice president dick cheney. cheney says edward snowden is "a traitor." plain and simple. my asthma's under control. i don't miss out... you sat out most of our game yesterday! asthma doesn't affect my job... you were out sick last week. my asthma doesn't bother my family... you coughed all through our date night! i hardly use my rescue inhaler at all. what did you say? how about - every day? coping with asthma isn't controlling it. test your level of control at asthma.com, then talk to your doctor. there may be more you could do for your asthma. for those nights when it's more than a bad dream, be ready. for the times you need to double-check the temperature on the thermometer, be ready. for high fever, nothing works faster or lasts longer. be ready with children's motrin. ♪ [ male announcer ] eeny, meeny, miny, go. ♪ ♪ more adventures await in the new seven-passenger lexus gx. lease the 2014 gx 460 for $499 a month for 27 months. see your lexus dealer. for $499 a month for 27 months. ♪ (train horn) vo: wherever our trains go, the economy comes to life. norfolk southern. on
edwards snowden and a lot has changed since then, especially for the people who helped leak the information. jonathan betz has a look at that story. >> it's a global story that began in the summer with edward snowden. he is now in asylum in russia but the scandal keeps unfolding because he reported handed over almost all of his secrets to two journalists, greenwald who is based in brazil. he keeps breaking stories printed in papers all over the world, usually until countries where they will make the biggest splash. greenwald works as a columnist for the guardian. on thursday, he is leaving that british paper to help start a new journalistic venture funded by the founder of ebay. that site will likely continue revealing nsa stories. his reporting partner will join him there. she was actually the first to connecticut with snowden but works mainly behind the scenes. she is a film maker putting together a documentary about all of this and then there is julian assange. he had a minor role. nudge went to wikileaks but he did help him avoid u.s. authorities. he remained holed up in
released by edward snowden and said a few things about it. one, not the nsa listening in on this call data. it was the nsa, the u.s. and all of its nato partners. the cold data had nothing do with the spanish and french but a collection of call data listen -- listen to it in a number of countries in support of military operations. he said it is completely false. one, this was the msa doing this and, two, it was european citizens, french, and spanish citizens that were being listened to. pretty aggressive knockdown of that story and some of the source of some of the greatest criticism from european side of nsa surveillance. >> jim, part of the white house pushback has been everybody does it. clapper also saying that foreign countries also spy on the u.s. so -- looking at that further, is it possible that the president's blackberry is being read by the germans or the british? >> i asked this of a former official yesterday. i was being -- he said, sure. they probably go after it. i don't know if they would have success. nsa has advantages. but one of the points that mike rogers made in this h
correct because of some of the issues that edward snowden has been able to put out. their mission lately has been to try to make the american people more aware of the terrorist plots that have been foiled because of their action. over theseen red chili summer and even this week general alexander and director clapper be more forthright over the plot that have been foiled third if you count europe, it gets into the couple dozen area. that is something we have to be able to put out there to give reassurance to people like your that the intelligence community are doing all they can to protect us from international terrorism. host: our guest, michael allen, managing director of beacon global strategies, author of "blinking red -- crisis and compromise in american intelligence after 9/11." former majority staff, other position similar to that as well. south carolina, democrat line. caller: hi, pedro. i had a comment and a question for mr. allen. you are uniquely qualified to answer my question. that ient is added up is am a retired master sergeant, and the phrase plausible deniability -- that
on and on and on. one assumes this is why edward snowden -- this is his plan. but there doesn't seem to be a great deal of defense for the nsa from people that you know full well, if we were to have a terrorist attack, the first question they would be asking is why was your spying efforts, your surveillance efforts, not ubiquitous, universal and intense. what do you think? >> well, you're absolutely right. first, alexander -- general alexander, i know him very well, was with him last night at an award dinner here, we gave him an award, and he's just a first-rate general officer, but more important than that, a first-rate intelligence officer and spy. he's absolutely hands down the best we've ever had in this job. he's been in it for eight years. and he's leaving of his own volition to get a new set of eyes, it's time. it truly is unfair. these allegations, a lot of these things make no sense. and certainly they are left to deny and suprt the nsa themselves. they and clapper, the director of national intelligence, that is who is defending this major function that protects the united states and beli
by contractor edward snowden. this comes amid the political fire storm over whether president obama was informed that the german prime minister's phone calls were wiretapped. >> giving any document at all about any world leader, the person briefing him or the briefing bookie would have to say where it came from, especially since it's so controversial, so sensitive, i should say. to no. i can't believe as commander in chief, as president of the united states that if this was being done that he didn't know about it. >> and others, democratic operatives, say there's every reason to believe the president did know that there was this danger and this is why he gave up his blackberry. >> when the private gave up his blackberry the day he became president and he was upset he had to give it up, why? because other countries would be listening in on it. the real miracle or stunning thing to me is that the british purchase thought she could talk to a cell phone and no one would be listening to her, allies or foes would be listening in on her conversations. of course we were. >> how does the n.s.a. respond t
based on the information leaked by former nsa contractor edward snowden. reports deny that president obama knew that nsa was spying on angela merkel. >>> news executives are in a london courtroom charged with tackinhacking phones and bribing officials. the trial is expected to run through spring. >>> there is a new glitch playing the affordable healthcare website. the data hub is down halting online enrollment. that hub went down on sunday. it's key in determining eligibility for tax credits which can reduce the cost of those monthly insurance problems. the problem was caused with a connectivity issue at a center operated by verizon. those are your headlines. consider this i"consider this" e have news 24 hours a day at www.aljazeera.com. fought by antibiotics. is it too late to catch up and infections. >> a look at america's conspiracy theories with brad melt zer. did bobby kennedy take his brother's brain and how long was the fbi tracking lee harvey oswald before the assassination. >> wing suit flying is a deadly sport. mountains. >> i'm antonio mora, welcome to "consider this." we
on to say that media outlets have misinterpreted documents that were leaked by edward snowden. and much of the data from europe was collected by intelligence agencies of our allies. they collected the phone records said general alexander and shared them with the u.s. >>> u.s. special forces reveal they were just hours from embarking on a dangerous covert operation earlier this month to capture a major benghazi terror suspect. special forces were ready if ordered to capture ahmed abu khattala. the mission never materialized. partly because there was so much publicity inside libya and the western press about another raid in libya just hours later. that raid led to the capture of suspected al qaeda operative abu anas al libi in tripoli. and he's in u.s. soil. >>> maliki will meet with president obama on friday. he is asking the u.s. for more counterterrorism aid and he'll also discuss purchasing american-made apache highlights and other equipment. senate leaders are warning that maliki is leading america back to civil war and he's who tao receptive to the influence of iraq and iran. >>> bo
the firm whose background checks helped nsa leaker edward snowden and aaron alexis get clearances. they are accused of failing to perform quality control reviews in its investigations of potential government workers. >>> check out the white house. it's getting beautified or boo-tified for halloween. lit up in orange and purple lights. decorated with jack-o'-lanterns and cobwebs. imagine if the white house is in your neighborhood. what are we going to get? >> a long security line. >> that's true. >>> coming up on "new day," we heard the apologies from kathleen sebelius, the vice president. why? obvious, the obama care website. they're pledging to get it fixed. the question, is that enough. >>> and the startling new accusation against the nsa. the agency says it was not peering into yahoo! and google databases. what it is not denying is raising more questions. (train horn) vo: wherever our trains go, the economy comes to life. norfolk southern. one line, infinite possibilities. i started part-time, now i'm a manager.n. my employer matches my charitable giving. really. i get bonuses
classified information from ex-nsa employee edward snowden. added if they don't stop doing so "it will be very difficult for government to stand back and not to act." bret. >> james, thank you. >>> answers are still hard to come by in the investigation into last fall's benghazi terror assault. last night one of journalisms heavy hitter confirms what we knew and had reported on. correspondent add day housely has the latest from los angeles. >> reporter: it's been more than a year since the attacks on benghazi and still information provided by the state department, military, cia and the white house has been incomplete, contradictory and fails to answer many questions. >> a lot of responsibility, a lot of ownous that needs to be taken up and accounted for. >> reporter: but accounts have been tough to come by. as witnesses claim they've been threatened and in some cases forced to sign nondisclosure agreements. fox spoke last may with an american special operator who witnessed the attack. >> i don't blame -- you know, it's something that's a risky especially in our profession to say an
by edward snowden. and that slide showing she is numbers in millions and so on. but in fact, the nsa collected no information in europe. they say that any information, any of this metadata, that's what it was just metadata. not phone calls or content. was done by european intelligence services not by the nsa. and that in fact it was nof of citizens of those countries, france and spain, but collected from a number of sources by the u.s. and nato allies in support of military operations abroad. here's how they made that case at the hearings today. >> assertions by reporters in france, lemond, spain, el mundo, italy espresso that new york sa collected millions of phone calls are completely false. to be perfectly clear, this is not information that we collected on european citizens. it represents information that we and our nato allies have collected in defense of our countries and in support of military operations. >> so in effect they're saying there that one of the strongest reasons for this anger we've been seeing from europe started with nothing, the misinterpretation, erin, of a si
edward snowden is reinforcing the notion that u.s. spying spreads wide and goes deep. the latest bombshell, partly denied by the obama administration, appears in the "washington post." it says u.s. intelligence agencies have gained access to hundreds of millions of google and yahoo user accounts by secretly tapping into company data centers. late today, six top tech companies-- yahoo, google, aol, apple, microsoft and facebook-- sent a letter to congress, calling for enhanced privacy protections. barton gellman broke the story for "the washington post." welcome, bart gellman, how are you? welcome to the newshour. what is the difference between what you're reporting that happened and what the white house and the administration is pushing back at and saying didn't happen? >> well, there have been several versions of it but so far they have not denied any of the facts stated in the story. yesterday general alexander, the head of the n.s.a., denied that the n.s.a. is tapping into the servers or databases or data centers of google and yahoo! that's not what we said. what we said is th
assumes this is why edward snowden -- this is his plan. but there doesn't seem to be a great deal of defense for the nsa from people that you know full well, if we were to have a terrorist attack, the first question they would be asking is why was your spying efforts, your surveillance efforts, not ubiquitous, universal and intense. what do you think? >> well, you're absolutely right. first, alexander -- general alexander, i know him very well, was with him last night at an award dinner here, we gave him an award, and he's just a first-rate general officer, but more important than that, a first-rate intelligence officer and spy. he's absolutely hands down the best we've ever had in this job. he's been in it for eight years. and he's leaving of his own volition to get a new set of eyes, it's time. it truly is unfair. these allegations, a lot of these things make no sense. and certainly they are left to deny and support the nsa themselves. they and clapper, the director of national intelligence, that is who is defending this major function that protects the united states and believe
are questioning the quality of background checks. the edward snowden case, of course, raises some any questions. and so does the wikileaks. just yesterday we learned that the department of justice has joined a lawsuit against a company called united states investigations services, commonly known as usis. this is a company that formed about 45% of the background investigations that are contracted out by the office of personnel management. according to this lawsuit, usis engaged in a practice that company insiders referred to as dumping. some refer to as flushing. under this alleged scam they would send investigations back to the office of personnel management even though they had not gone through the full review process. through this dumping, usis maximized its profits. many national security experts have long argued the security clearance process is antiquated and in need of modernization. given recent events i think we have to ask whether the system is fundamentally flawed. we should also be mindful for many years both congress and the federal agencies were concerned about the backlog of secur
that we have would not necessarily know that level of detail. >> so was edward snowden a trader? >> you're asking me? absolutely. >> is that your opinion? >> absolutely. >> yes ma'am. >> certainly not with treason very he has been charged with leaking and compromising the integrity of the intelligence system. >> in your opinion, your personal opinion. >> unfortunately with the case involved as a justice official i cannot do that with professional responsibility. >> does the white house consider mr. snowden a trader? >> when you say the white house collectively i think most people feel that he has done the great disservice to the country. >> i yelled back. >> i want to make sure i answered them just to make sure i hit those rate? you did ask some constitutional questions spiffy only one i might add to is the foreigners were in the united states to have certain constitutional rights that would be the only amendment to what general alexander said. >> maybe you could elaborate what those instances would be and what rights they could have. >> we will get better permission to use the back i y
this out, maintaining relevance in the arena, it should have been better by not allowing edward snowden to steal the documents that he stole from our country. "the guardian," is operating in its own best interest. they have inherited stolen goods, stolen information, and ind to be held accountable informing the world of these instances. what was stolen, we have tried as best we can to figure out what all he does have, but we are really at the mercy of "the guardian" as to how they roll the revelations out and how they spin them. it is a mostly inaccurate portrayal of that data. do you and the intelligence communities know exactly what he has? guest: no, he could have some stuff that we are not aware of. host: do you have an idea a echo -- id a? guest: -- idea? guest: we do in some instances, but not everything. host: they still cannot answer that question? guest: not definitively. no one can answer that question. host: how is it that that is not possible? there is a lot of it that he took over a long. of time. host: so, there is more to come? guest: i do not know, in infinite wisdom. ho
spies here. the problem is you can't get caught. somewhere in russia edward snowden is smiling right now, coming up in congressional testimony like we've heard. so this has really thrown off the -- thrown the white house off balance. at first, the president was saying the nsa is not spying on americans. now they've have to deal with spying on foreign leaders. that's been the big problem. >> okay. bob cusack, thank you very much. coming up next, the cnn film "blackfish" has sparked a nationwide debate over what should be done with killer whales in captivity. there's been a huge push to set the whales free. the big question is, once the whales are released back into the ocean, what happens next? we investigate that after the break. it's a growing trend in business: do more with less with less energy. hp is helping ups do just that. soon, the world's most intelligent servers, designed by hp, will give ups over twice the performance, using forty percent less energy. multiply that across over a thousand locations, and they'll provide the same benefit to the environment as over 60,000 trees. t
't know about it until nsa leaker edward snowden revealed the u.s. was spying on other allies including leaders of mexico and brazil. the president says just because the nation's spy agencies are able to listen in on phone conversations doesn't necessarily mean they should. >> we give them policy direction but what we've seen over the last several years is their capacities continue to develop and expand and that's why i'm initiating now a review to make sure what they're able to do doesn't necessarily mean what they should be doing. >> reporter: the state department says the nsa spying disclosures have raised what they call a spokeswoman called significant challenges in some of these country's most important relationships and partnerships. brazil's president canceled a state visit over the snooping. jenna? jenna: worth pointing out editorial pages for conserve-leaning, liberal-leaning writers taken issue with this. some president's critics calling him the bystander president. why is that? >> reporter: the republican national committee strung together a group of problems that seemed to h
Search Results 0 to 30 of about 31 (some duplicates have been removed)

Terms of Use (10 Mar 2001)